Moral Support

Characters are so important because they are supposed to be living beings like us.

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I’ve enjoyed creating Clipper’s character. But creating other characters such as Chang, Sally, Reno, and others was a part of the fun writing this book. It’s true that characters are the most important part of a story. They need to be fleshed out in such a way. Characters are so important because they are supposed to be living beings like us.

Clipper has been a part of the story line for Rise of the Dragon since the very beginning. Never had Jacob been alone when the book was still in the form of an idea. They were the first two characters in the book. I eventually created their friends and the main antagonist. And I plan on introducing other characters in the future (I’m really excited for that).

Like anything that stands, there has to be some sort of support. The minor characters in The Tales of Draco are the support. It would be very hard to write about Jacob if he’s the all alone, having to learn everything by himself and having to fight an entire force of evil with no help. When you think about it, it would have been a very lonely experience. Not only does Clipper help by being at Jacob’s side, Jacob has other friends. Consider this moral support for Jacob. And that’s support that most stories (there are a few exceptions) depend on.

A Time for Action…

When I read a book, I often like a good action scene, especially when it moves the plot along at a comfortable pace. It’s also good to have a few down scenes as well just so the story can be easier to follow. While writing Rise of the Dragon, I really loved creating action scenes. Sometimes I would feel like I was there, observing the action as it unfolds.

But as much as I like writing action scenes, I also find it enjoyable to write down scenes, or scenes with less intense action. I believe it’s good for a story to have down scenes so there is more than just mindless action.

Some stories rely on action more than others. And they work in many ways. The important thing is, a story’s plot must flow at a good pace. There is a time for action, and a time for repose.

The Library: A Place of Significance

Libraries are important in the history of civilization.

If you ask any author, most will say that libraries are great places. A library is one of my favorite places to be. Not only are there many books to read, but a library is a place of knowledge. Especially today, libraries are places of many resources. What should be known is how important libraries are in the history of civilization.

Libraries have been around for thousands of years, dating back to ancient Greece and Egypt. In those days, people were willing to travel hundreds of miles to visit a library. Stories and records of the great people in history were at the travelers’ fingertips. The long trip would be worth it. Today, we don’t have to travel mile after mile. But the reason why we visit a library is the same. A library is the sanctuary for literature.

When you look back in history, you may notice how big a role literature plays in the evolution of civilization. Ancient nations flourished in golden ages of literature. Think of ancient Greece for example. Greece was a nation that revolutionized the world at the time. At its height, stories of Greek heroes were being told and written down. Some of these stories are still told today. Now think of the Renaissance. It was an era of expansion and a renewal of culture. This was when the printing press was invented. Books were created by the thousands. Civilization advanced forward at a fast pace.

It comes to show that books are important to society. We will slip in an age of darkness without it. And libraries are the core of literature. They are significant pieces to our civil lives.

Animals and Dragons; a Connection

I love animals. They fascinate me in many different ways. I’m always interested in how diverse our world is. You may ask what this has to do with The Tales of Draco and, particularly, the dragons in the book. The truth is, it has a lot to do with the elements in the book. My fascination of animals has a big influence in The Tales of Draco.

For instance, Jacob Draco’s interest in animals and his life on the farm play a big role in the plot. This is what drives him and Clipper to begin their major experiment in Rise of the Dragon. As dragons, they discover their own natural gifts such as using their claws, charging with their horns, or breathing fire among many other things.

So are dragons in The Tales of Draco technically animals? You could say so, in a way as if you classify humans as mammals. Marissa Durfee, my sister and main illustrator, once said that dragons are human, just a different type of human.

We humans have our own knowledge of good and evil, so do dragons. But when you look closer, animals are more like us in many ways. Animals bleed, think, feel, and hurt just like humans do. I’m not saying that I’m against rightful hunting or the use of animals for farming. I’m saying that we should acknowledge their existence. Respect to animals can help us respect ourselves.

The Moral of a Story

Morals and themes are essential to a story. They are what make the story have meaning. Successful authors will try to teach their readers something, most often life lessons. Think of some classical works for a moment. There are many that are famous for their morals. Some obvious examples are Aesop’s fables or the use of symbolism in William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. There are many other great works that have great morals, even if these works are not famous for having them. Authors like Tolkien and Lewis use many allegories that teach us valuable life lessons, and they are not the only ones who write to teach.

Stories that stand the test of time will always have some sort of moral or else they would be pointless. Our very literature in our world is used to teach lessons that will help us function as a society.

The American/English Spelling Technique

It is important to know the nature of the English language…

The English language is broad. Being the second-most spoken and most diverse language,  it comes to no surprise that it differs from region to region. A person from Portland, Oregon will likely understand what a person from London is saying, but they might speak in a different accent and even a different dialect. It is important to know the nature of the English language as a writer.

One thing I had to be aware of when writing dialogue is the accent the speaking character will have. In The Tales of Draco, I use the typical American spelling (honor, color, scepter, etc.) in the narration because the main character speaks in that accent. But I use English spelling (honour, colour, sceptre, etc.) for characters with foreign accents, though that doesn’t necessarily mean the character’s accent is English. The spelling can also be changed in a way to put emphasis on how a character pronounces certain words. An example of the American/English spelling is used for Clipper. Clipper speaks with a Canadian accent, and words are spelled in the English style in Canada. Even though Clipper’s accent slightly differs from Jacob’s, it is still similar; so I still use American spelling for his dialogue. This contrasts with some of the dwarves and other characters where I use English spelling.

As I’ve mentioned before, when I use English spelling, it doesn’t always mean the accent is English. I use this spelling to indicate that the accent differs from Jacob and Clipper’s accents. You’ll see this American/English spelling more in future books in the series. When a character has a foreign accent, I use English spelling, even if the accent isn’t English. Sometimes the spelling will change in another way depending on the accent; it isn’t always English spelling.

I’m not saying the American/English technique is the correct way to add accent in dialogue. I’ve read plenty of books that use one type of spelling, even in dialogue. I just use the American/English technique in dialogue, depending on who is speaking. I only use American spelling in the narration.

If you ever decide to use the American/English technique, just remember to do it appropriately. Be aware of how you spell words in dialogue and most especially in the narration.

Inspiration and Literature Progression

As important as I believe inspiration is, it can be a little hard to understand.

I personally believe inspiration is a wonderful thing. It is what moves the good in humanity forward. I have plenty of inspiration while I’m writing in The Tales of Draco, and I have seen readers become inspired by my work.  As important as I believe inspiration is, it can be a little hard to understand.

One thing I like to do is not reread books I’ve read in the past, but analyze them. I study the story’s structure, the sentence structure, and what works and what doesn’t work well in the story. I don’t do this to put that story’s work in my own. but learn from it.

When you want your story to have creativity, you have to be careful with how you interpret inspiration, or else your story may just be a bland rip-off of something successful. You won’t be seen as the next J.K. Rowling if you just copy the exact same plot. Creativity comes if you study what worked for that particular book. Your readers may want something similar to an earlier and more successful book, but most don’t want the same story retold. For example, if you are writing in the genre of fantasy, it is good to incorporate elements that fantasy readers will enjoy in a brand new adventure that they have never endured before.

I have been inspired by other authors and I do have their writing influence my own writing, but I don’t want my series to be the next Lord of the Rings. I want it to be The Tales of Draco. When you want to be inspired, you must “use” the author’s work, not “take” it. Inspiration may be hard to interpret, but it is something that every one of us has. And it is not just in writing, but in everything we do.